Benefits of a Minimalist Home

minimalist vanity

It’s true, according to Psychology Today, clutter has a negative effect on our brains and our lives. Clutter can induce stress and anxiety, making it difficult for us to focus or relax. It’s all about architectural balance: Finding a balance in your home that imbues peace, order and fulfillment. The means to that end is simple—minimalize your home. Our Vail Valley architects provide reasons why updating your home to a minimalist approach will benefit you both in the short- and long-term.

Benefits of a Minimalist Home in Vail Valley

When an outsider thinks of Vail Valley, they imagine majestic mountains, spas and overall healthy lifestyles. And it’s true, this is the Vail Valley way, and so it should extend to your home. Here are five main reasons how a minimalist home benefits you.

  1. Have less stress. Clutter is a tangible representation of chaos, and chaos causes stress. Your mind can’t rest. Without clutter, comes peace of mind.
  2. Be more productive. Cleaning up the clutter and opening spaces in your home is literally opening spaces in your mind. You can be more productive and think more clearly.
  3. Experience more freedom. Having things, things and more things ties us to one place. Start donating unneeded items and feel how liberating it is.
  4. Feel a calming effect. This benefit is both internal and external. There’s a sense of order and calm within the house that affects everyone. There’s less cleaning to do. With fewer distractions, you are calmer and more relaxed.
  5. Maintain a clean appearance. It is easier to keep a minimalist home clean, but the appearance itself is simply clean. It’s free of distractions, free of unnecessary items, and free of things that complicate life.

If you want more productivity, freedom and relaxation, then you should consider a minimalist home. Contact a professional Vail Valley architect to start getting your life the way you want it!

Want to view more of our work, with luxurious features complemented by a beautiful babbling brook? See this article from Mountain Living.