Looking Ahead: Which Colors Will Be Hot for 2019 Decorating?

Even while others are still basking in the lingering glow of the summer, our trendsetters are already hard at work looking into the future to determine which colors will be hot for decorating in 2019. Trends today are much more global, with everything from Paris Fashion Week to the first lady’s dress informing the look and feel of the coming seasons. Interior design continues to move toward a more minimalistic look and feel, something that resonates well with architects and homeowners alike.

Soft, Sustainable Colors and Styles

Several designers have noted that a more sustainable look and feel has been creeping into design options over the past few months — a trend that is expected to accelerate going throughout the year in 2019. Interior products that are ethnically designed and produced top the charts, and with this shift comes a softer and more subtle style and color palette.

2019 Paint Colors

If 2018 was the year of smoky shades of gray, 2019 is prepping to be a paradise of strong, natural colors. From berries to sage and even dark charcoal, the essence of the color palette leans more toward matte than glossy, more toward neutral than bold. Earth tones are being adopted by all the major paint manufacturers, with deep, rich shades that mesh well with more traditional and natural building materials.

Back to Black

From your little black dress to your kitchen, black is making a comeback — especially in design that features matte black-on-black. The added dimension of the darker shades and bold statements provides an ongoing conversation piece and focal point for your living room or bedroom designs. Kitchens and bathrooms are also seen sporting shades of deep gray or black as an accent to beiges, pinks and golden tones.

Whether you’re prepping for a major home upgrade or building a new house, the 2019 trends are always in fashion at TAB Associates. Learn more about seasonal decor changes and other great options for your home on our blog.

Schedule a consultation today to gain insight on your next project by calling us at 970-766-1470 or via email at info@tabassociates.com.

4 Ways to Add Subtle Seasonal Changes to Your Decor

Seasonal Changes to Your Decor

As we shift into fall, there’s an impulse to get fully into the spirit of the season — with scented candles, pumpkin spice everything and leaves on every surface. But though fall has its own feel and decor, the shift from summer to fall can still be subtle, requiring very little work to make the change. Here are a few tips on how to set up your seasonal decor for easy shifts between the seasons.

4 Ways to Add Subtle Seasonal Changes to Your Decor

  1. Keep your seasonal decor flexible. Instead of laying out a huge amount of decor that is specific to individual seasons, look for more general fall-themed options, such as adding apples, leaves, pine cones, burlap, candles and straw.
  2. Shift between seasons by adding a few touches. With school starting, add a few apples to your centerpiece or mantle as summer’s long, slow days shift into fall’s dry, cool weather and falling leaves. As the season continues, add a fall-themed bow to a door wreath or bouquet.
  3. Make subtle shifts from summer to winter. If you can, consider adding acorns earlier in the season and replace them with frosted pinecones later on. You can also create an arrangement of fall flowers in September and replace them with frosted berries around Thanksgiving.
  4. To celebrate holidays, add a few special items that will still work through the rest of the season. A few simple changes can help you recognize holidays without going overboard in the process.

By keeping your decor adaptable to the changes in the seasons, you’ll be able to reduce your overall workload while still making your home look fabulous. Is it the house itself that’s part of your decor problem? Why not find out what our Vail Valley architects can do to make it right for you? Please feel free to contact the professionals at TAB Associates today to get started.

Eagle Valley High School

Over the past year one of the projects I have been working on has been the Construction Administration for the Addition and Renovation of the Eagle Valley High School in Gypsum Colorado. While the school was never closed due to construction we are in the middle of the final summer push before school resumes for the 2018-2019 school year.

The school went through the demolition of an older section to make room for a new two story science wing and adjacent courtyard.

The Autoshop class was relocated offsite and the Autoshop building was removed to make room for the additional parking needed for a larger student population.

There is an entirely new building which has a little bit of everything, from a lecture hall to culinary classrooms to a CNA training room. The school is collaborating with the local community college, Colorado Mountain College, for some of the classes.

This is all in addition to extensive renovations to the locker rooms, office administration, and the library.

 

For me there is a great sense of accomplishment with collaborating with the local schools as you are helping to shape the learning environments of the future generations and perhaps working where my kids will someday attend.

-Warner Hopkins

3 Summer Decorating Tips to Create a Welcoming Space

welcoming summer space

Creating a timeless and welcoming space in your home is something that can easily be achieved with a few simple design tricks. But as the seasons change, it’s always fun to mix it up with your decor choices. As the summer sun brightens up the views in Vail Valley, many homeowners are inspired to make some changes around the house with lighter decor options. Check out a few of our favorite summer decoration tips to get your creative juices flowing.

3 Gorgeous Summer Decoration Tips for Your Home

1. Pare Down

An easy way to make your home feel welcoming on those hot summer days is to think of the space in the same way you would think of a summer vacation rental. Throw open the doors and windows, let the sunshine in by pulling back heavy curtains and get rid of any pieces that are dark or fussy. Store your heavy winter throws and trade them in for pops of colors throughout your home.

2. Amp Up Your Bar

Everyone loves a fresh and fruity summer cocktail or mocktail, so why not make your bar area a focal point for the summer season? With a dedicated refreshment station in your home, you can create a relaxation area that is designed to welcome family and friends inside to grab their favorite summer refreshment.

3. Fill Up the Fireplace

You won’t need to use your fireplace for the next couple of months, so why not transform it for the summer? Stack leftover wood inside or position your favorite candles to make good use of the otherwise unused space. If you’re a fan of more natural decor, you can even frame a large amethyst crystal or hunk of coral inside.

Enjoy a Beautiful and Relaxing Summer in Vail Valley

Interested in learning more about the best architecture to complement your design ideas? Contact our Vail Valley architects at TAB Associates online today for more information.

TAB Associates, INC. North Carolina Architecture Firm Opens it’s Doors

Well, here we are again time to post in the blog.  Well let me tell you a little something about the new office in western North Carolina.  It is located about 20 miles south of Asheville in Hendersonville.  We are one block from Main Street on Church Street.  We share the building with Glennwood Custom Builders.  They are in Suite A and we are in Suite B.  Here is a picture of the front door.  Actually, the front door is being replaced with a wood door.  We are just waiting on the custom hardware which is a few weeks out.  There is a backlit LED sign to go above the door to match the one in the window.  It will eventually be moved out to the gable end when the building is renovated.New North Carolina Architecture Firm

Later this summer, the building owner is supposed to be renovating the exterior of the building to a design we did for him.

architecture firm exterior

Corten panels above reclaimed siding with heavy timber beam and king posts gables on new stone and timber columns at each entry.  This should be quite the improvement over the green metal mansard and brick veneer existing exterior.

Inside we mixed up the interiors with an ultra-modern reception area and a rustic conference room.  We added a Jim Harrison giclée of one of his famous Coca Cola barns.  Jim was a favorite South Carolina painter from Denmark, South Carolina about 3 hours south of us.

architecture firm interiorarchitecture firm conference room In the work area, we used what we know works and copied the Edwards office for the desks.  We put in a similar Kitchenette, but stayed with the theme in the office and had the cabinets painted a custom color, purple of course.

Now we are marketing to land a few projects.  Then we will start to hire some local talent and train them to the TAB ways.  We started off by joining the Asheville Home Builders Association.  We have recently joined the Land of the Sky Association of Realtors (Asheville’s Board) and the Hendersonville Board of Realtors.  Getting emails out to all of the members announcing the opening of this office was a challenge, but was successful.  Currently we are licensed in Colorado, North Carolina, South Carolina and Montana.  We are nationally certified and can be licensed in any state.  If you have any need of an Architect, please contact TAB Associates, Inc.

Best Interior Decorating Secrets to Highlight Your Home’s Architecture

interior design secrets

If you’re like most people, chances are you like to update the interior decor of your home every once in a while. Unfortunately, as you may know from experience, interior decorating is often much harder than it looks. While you may have a good idea of what type of look you’re going for, you may be uncertain in terms of how to achieve this look. Here are two of the best interior decorating secrets that will make your life a lot easier.

Layering

Professional interior designers know rich and interesting spaces tend to feature layering, or pieces of decor on top of other decor. A common example of layering is having framed art lean on top of other framed art. An interior designer may also pair stacks of books with small trinkets to add more layers to a room.

When it comes to layering, a common concern that homeowners have is that there’s no point in putting things in a space if you can’t see them in their entirety. However, one major point of layering is to create a sense of mystery in a space. Don’t be afraid to obscure almost the entirety of an art piece by placing a lamp or plant in front of it. Not only will it make your guests eager to explore your home, but it may even make you feel as if there are things you have yet to discover in your own home.

Negative Space

The power of negative space is another interior decor secret that many professionals take advantage of. Believe it or not, the empty space in a room can be just as important as the actual decor.

The main goal of designing a space is to make it feel and look as balanced as possible. While it’s important that you don’t skimp on furniture, accessories, and art so that a space doesn’t feel exciting and full, you also want to avoid using so much decor that a room feels stuffed and overwhelming.

Taking advantage of negative space and layering is a great way to achieve design balance. For more information about the best architecture to complement your design ideas, don’t hesitate to reach out to our Vail Valley architects here at Tab and Associates.

In the Works – Greg Macik

In our next series of post each of our team members will post about the projects they are currently work on.

It has been an exciting time for TAB Associates the last two years. We have grown from 3 to 8 team members and have expanded with a new office in North Carolina.

We have always kept our portfolio of projects wide covering all aspects of Architecture. Current project lists include Educational, Resort, Commercial, Single family and multi-family Residential and Master Planning projects.

Personally, as Principal Architect in the Edwards office I have been here to help guide the office as we transition to the two office company.  I have still been producing a lot of work on the board but also helping to direct the office in new marketing opportunities, staff development and just day to day operations.

Enjoy the post over the coming weeks.

Meet Our Team – CJ Spell

Hello! I am CJ, the newest member of the TAB team.  I was born and raised here in the Eagle Valley and after receiving a Bachelor’s of Environmental Design from the University of Colorado Boulder, I packed up my bags and moved to Bozeman, Montana where I earned a Masters of Architecture.  Eventually I found my way back to Colorado and spent 3 years in Fort Collins before coming back to the mountains.

Professionally I have strong interests in music performance spaces, community planning, historic preservation, and sustainable design.  In the past I have worked on a wide range of design projects from net zero energy residential developments, community music spaces, to office and mixed use buildings.  Throughout this journey I have developed a wide range of technical skills to help visualize projects in their early stages to allow for good design decisions.

In my free time you will find me on my next adventure often near a lake, with a camera, friends and fly rod in tow and when not out exploring, I will most likely be in the music studio composing songs that I swear someday I will finish.

How Architectural Elements of a Home Can Make a House Feel Like a Home

architectural balance

Balance in a home is important. Balance does not have to mean symmetry; it can mean a sense or feel of balance where one element balances another element. Architectural balance is an idea that has been put forth by some Vail Valley architects in the work they do, and a recent study confirms it.

A House vs. a Home: The Balance of Vail Valley Architecture & Psychology

study in Australia revealed that one’s psychological state and association of home is directly related to architectural balance. The physical nature of a place can have a significant impact on the dweller’s perception of the place, whether the dweller deems the place a home or just a house. Here are three takeaways from this study.

  1. Traditionally, the concept of home has always been perceived as a psychological construct of our human condition taken from our personal and social lives and our memories. The home was something our minds created through what we perceived to be a home. But now, we know home is both a psychological and architectural concept. Both are intrinsically connected.
  2. Architecture impacts a person’s psyche and has a direct impact on the perception of what a home is or means. The architecture of a structure can — if designed accordingly — positively impact the occupant of the structure and create a connection with it. On the other hand, if the architecture poses no stimulation, the mind is not stimulated and a connection to the structure is not made. The structure, therefore, is just a structure, a place where one lays his or her hat, and that’s all.
  3. The balance between architectural design and psychology is what helps make a house a home. Architectural balance lends itself to this effort through the proper distribution of aesthetically appealing architectural design and elements.

Vail Valley architects work to bring balance to any house so you have yourself a home, and that’s something you live in with peace of mind. Contact TAB Associates today to assist you in the design of your dream home!

Meet Our Team – Anna Griffith

Hello world! Anna Griffith here from Tab Associates.  I have been with TAB Associates for almost a year now and feel so lucky to have found such a great team to work with.  I received my masters last spring from University of Colorado Denver and moved to the valley shortly after.  It feels so good to be back in the mountains of Colorado.

I was born and raised in Durango, Colorado and received my Bachelors from Montana State University in Bozeman.  These small mountain communities have helped shape who I am today and are a continuing reminder of what I hold dear in life.

Through my work, I aim to bring awareness and presence to the natural beauty that surrounds us.  One project I am particularly proud of is a 300sf cabin designed for the director of the Colorado Outward Bound program located in Leadville, Colorado.  Through the Colorado Building Workshop, 28 students designed and built 7 cabins over the course of a semester.  This was an incredibly rich experience which has helped shape the trajectory of my career.